Is it human trafficking?

Force, fraud, or coercion

U.S. law defines human trafficking as the use of force, fraud, or coercion to compel a person into commercial sex acts or labor or services against his or her will. The one exception involves minors and commercial sex. Inducing a minor into commercial sex is considered human trafficking regardless of the presence of force, fraud or coercion.

Action-Means-Purpose

The Action-Means-Purpose (AMP) Model can be helpful in understanding the federal law. Human trafficking occurs when a perpetrator, often referred to as a trafficker, takes an Action, and then employs the Means of force, fraud or coercion for the Purpose of compelling the victim to provide commercial sex acts or labor or services. At a minimum, one element from each column must be present to establish a potential situation of human trafficking.

 

Power and Control Wheel

There is no single method of force, fraud or coercion. Based on the Domestic Abuse Intervention Project’s Duluth Model, this Power and Control wheel outlines the different types of abuse that can occur in labor and sex trafficking situations.